NDLCC Standards Compliance: Programming for Teens and Adults

Guest post by Mary Soucie, State Librarian (first published in the September 2016 issue of Flickertale)

libraryThis  is  our  continuing  series  on  compliance  with  the  North  Dakota  Library  Coordinating  Council’s  Standards  for  Public Libraries. This month, we are going to focus on library programming, one of my passions. I absolutely love library programming for all ages. In today’s busy world, libraries are serving the needs of their patrons in new and traditional ways. Library programming has increased as has attendance.

The standards for public libraries indicate that libraries serving a populations of up to 12,500 should provide programs for all ages. For the libraries serving populations over 12,500, there are a specific number of programs required for each level- kids, teens and adults.

Many of our ND libraries offer programs for kids. More libraries are offering programs for adults; including everything from coloring clubs to books-in-bars book clubs to craft programs. Some of our libraries offer summer reading programs for all ages while others offer summer reading programs for kids and teens and a winter reading program for adults.

I think it’s important to offer programs for all ages.  As libraries continue to strive to prove their value and relevance in the “Google era”, it is one way to meet the needs of the community. Programs will bring different people into the library and will get people talking about the library.

I am going to focus on adult and teen programs because our ND public libraries have a good handle on offering kids programs. If you’re struggling with how to start expanding your programs to include adults or teens, consider offering some programs that are open to teens and adults. Craft programs are one type of program that you can easily include both age groups in. When the State Library recently held our Pokémon Go event, we had people of all ages in the library; and the different age groups participated in all aspects of the program. If you have an adult coloring group, why not open it to teens?

If you are struggling to serve teens, consider partnering with the local school district on something. Perhaps a book club that is held at the school but run by the library. Stock up on duct tape and have a drop-in “build a something”, a wallet for example, from duct tape.

Consider offering adult programs beyond just a book club. There are lots of ideas for adult programs. One program that I wanted to implement at my last library (but left before I got the chance) was a “cooking club”. Choose a different food group each month, such as soups, and each person makes a sample and brings it to share. The library can share the resources that they have that tie in with the food group; be creative and think beyond cookbooks. A friend of mine did this at her library and patrons were very responsive.

Programming doesn’t have to be hard or onerous on the librarian. Don’t feel like you have to provide all the programs either. If you know someone with a hobby, invite them in to do a library program for you. If you ever want to bounce ideas for library programs, give me a holler, as it’s one of my favorite topics to chat about. You can also visit the Field Notes blog (https://ndslfieldnotes.wordpress.com/) where you will find a plethora of posts about library programs.

NDLCC Standards Compliance Resource Links

Whether or not you attended one of our recent Summer Summit meetings, I wanted to ensure these resources were readily available and in one convenient location. If you need further assistance, don’t hesitate to contact your friendly Library Development Specialist here at the North Dakota State Library!

NDLCC Standards Compliance: ADA

Guest post by Mary Soucie, State Librarian (first published in the August 2016 issue of Flickertale)

This is the continuation of our series on compliance with different parts of the North Dakota Library Coordinating Council (NDLCC) Standards for Public libraries. We believe that the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliance is one of the areas that libraries may be more in compliance with than they realize. We don’t have any attorneys on staff at the North Dakota State Library (NDSL) so we can’t give you legal advice, but we will share our interpretation of what it means to be ADA compliant as well as resources you can consult on your own. We recommend that you also consult an attorney if you have questions.

The Americans with Disabilities Act was passed in 1990 and amended in 2010. From www.ada.gov, the ADA “prohibits discrimination and ensures equal opportunity for persons with disabilities in employment, state and local government services, public accommodations, commercial facilities, and transportation.”

State and local governments must operate services, programs, and activities so when viewed in its entirety, are readily accessible to individuals with disabilities. Older buildings may need to be altered to ensure accessibility.

Buildings that are new construction or altered must come into compliance with ADA requirements. The compliance standards, as well as applicable dates (1991 or 2010) can be found on www.ada.gov.

If you have questions about ADA compliance, please contact your Library Development Specialist.

Additional Resources:

Grants for Libraries

dollar signPenguin Random House Library Awards for Innovation

Application deadline: October 1st

The Penguin Random House Library Awards for Innovation recognize public libraries creating innovative community-based programs which encourage citizens to participate and support local reading initiatives that connect libraries with their community. One $10,000 grant and four runner-up $1,000 grants will be awarded. Award recipients will also receive $1,000 in Penguin Random House books. Learn more and apply at: http://foundation.penguinrandomhouse.com/libraryawards/guidelines-and-application/

Lowe’s Toolbox for Education Grants

Application deadline: September 26th

Each year, the Lowe’s Toolbox for Education grants program contributes more than $5 million to fund improvements at public schools in the United States. Projects should fall into one of the following categories: technology upgrades, tools for STEM programs, facility renovations, and safety improvements. Grant requests can range from $2,000 to $100,000, though most will be given in the $2,000 to $5,000 range. Additional details and online application available at: http://responsibility.lowes.com/apply-for-a-grant/

NTCA Rural Broadband Association’s Foundation for Rural Service Grant Program

Application deadline: October 1st

Communities served by NTCA members can apply for grants that support local efforts to build and sustain a high quality of life in rural America. Grants range from $250 to $5,000. They prioritize projects that foster collaboration among different community agencies and local government, have a long-lasting effect in the community, promote community participation and engagement, and make rural communities a better place to live and work. Find out more and apply here: http://www.frs.org/rural-community-outreach/grant-program

Sony Corporation of America Grants

Application deadline: Ongoing

Sony focuses the majority of its charitable giving on arts, culture, technology, and the environment, with a particular emphasis on education in each of those areas. Sony seeks to apply its financial, technological, and human resources to the encouragement of the creative, artistic, technical, and scientific skills required at tomorrow’s workforce. Read their guidelines and discover how to apply at: https://www.sony.com/en_us//SCA/social-responsibility/giving-guidelines.html

Shell

Application deadline: Ongoing

Shell supports K-12 programs that boost math and science skills. They are especially interested in supporting educational outreach in math, science, and technology to women and minority students and academic institutions with ethnically diverse enrollments. Priority consideration is given to organizations serving in or near US communities where Shell has a major presence. Eligibility requirements and application forms are accessible on their site: http://www.shell.us/sustainability/request-for-a-grant-from-shell.html

This article originally appeared in the August, 2016 issue of the State Library’s Flickertale (PDF).

NDLCC Standards Compliance: Board Orientation

Guest post by Mary Soucie, State Librarian (first published in the July 2016 issue of Flickertale)

This month, we are going to explore another of the NDLCC Standards: Board Orientation. As a former library director, a former public library trustee and a former regional library system trustee, I cannot stress enough how important it is to have a strong orientation for new board members.

It is critical that you share important information with trustees from the get-go. While orientations may vary some from library to library, there are some crucial elements that should be included. It is important to share the library’s vision and mission statements so that trustees understand the values and culture of the library. If your vision and mission statement don’t reflect the organizational values and culture, it may be time to look at an update to both statements. It is also important to share the library’s budget and a copy of all library policies.

I liked to create a binder for trustees that included our vision and mission statements; copies of the current policies; an organizational chart; the budget; an overview of the responsibilities of trustees and the responsibilities of the director; a copy of the most recent library newsletter; a welcome letter from the director; a schedule of board meetings; an address list of all board members, which also included terms; and a copy of the minutes from the last three meetings. Also included was an overview of open meetings and other pertinent local, state and federal laws.

I believe that the library director should conduct the orientation with assistance from the board president. It is also appropriate for the director to conduct the orientation on his/her own. I do not recommend that the board president present the orientation without the director.

As a trustee who was also a library director, it was important for me to have an orientation so I would know how that board operated. As a new trustee on the Regional Library System board, I needed to know the committee structure, expectations and responsibilities of the trustees. It was important for me to learn from the organization’s perspective what the role of the trustee was for that particular organization and how business was conducted at the board meetings.

Compliance with the standards by July 1, 2017, will be required for any public library that wishes to apply for Library Vision grants. If you need assistance creating an orientation for new board members or have any questions about the standards, please contact your Library Development Specialist. If you’re not sure who your LDS is, you can find out here: http://library.nd.gov/fieldservices.html

NDLCC Standards Compliance: Reader’s Advisory

Guest post by Mary Soucie, State Librarian (first published in the June 2016 issue of Flickertale)

After this year’s public library annual report, Library Development Manager Eric Stroshane completed an analysis of how our public libraries are doing in regards to being in compliance with the North Dakota Library Coordinating Council (NDLCC) Standards for Public Libraries. There are categories that all libraries are in compliance with. We are going to highlight the areas that don’t have 100% compliance.

The first topic we are going to write about is Reader’s Advisory. Reader’s Advisory (RA) is the act of recommending both fiction and nonfiction titles to patrons through direct and indirect methods.

books1[1]Direct is pretty straight and word forward. A patron asks for a good book, a mystery book, a self-help book… insert any request here. A librarian or staff member directs the patron to one or more titles that will fit their needs. Indirect includes everything from book displays to booklists/pathfinders to bookmarks.

In 2014, Library Journal published an article entitled “The State of Reader’s Advisory.” They identified four points of service where RA takes place:

In-person RA takes place 85% of the time at the reference desk and 59% at the circulation desk. Self-directed RA is also highly popular, with 94% of libraries creating book displays, for example, and 75% offering book lists. Book-oriented programs are widespread, too: the survey shows that book clubs (89%) and author visits (86%) are held at most libraries. The fourth point of service was digital: 79% of libraries provide read-alikes or other such tips on their websites, and a little less than half, recommendations via social media.

You can read the rest of the article at: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2014/02/library-services/the-state-of-readers-advisory/#_

I’ve taken advantage of RA via social networking several times and I love it. I’m not sure if any of our ND libraries are offering this but if you are, please be sure to let me know. One way to provide RA via social networking is to ask a reader to provide the last title they’ve read and then librarians recommend 3-5 titles based on that title. Another is to share book reviews via Twitter or Facebook. I know we do have some librarians doing this.

I think more of our libraries are providing Reader’s Advisory Services than indicated by the annual report. Hopefully, this article has helped you better identify the ways that you are providing RA that you didn’t identify as such.

If you have questions about the standards, please contact any member of the Library Development Team.

Hooray! Your Library’s a Pokéstop!

Pokestop

The North Dakota State Library is a Pokéstop and your library likely is, too!

Guest post by Shari Mosser, ND State Library

I wanna be the very best. Like no one ever was!

Lately, you might have seen random people outside your library – singly or in groups. The people range in age, background and lifestyles. The only thing in common is that they are usually holding a phone in front of their face. Sometimes they congregate for a half hour or so and then walk (or drive/bike) away. Others will just keep walking by or abruptly switch directions with excited looks on their faces.

These people are probably playing the new, popular, free-to-play game called Pokémon GO! It is so popular it is on the verge of overtaking the daily number of users that are on Twitter. Pokémon GO uses your phone’s GPS and clock to detect where you are in the game (so real world locations!) and make little “monsters” appear around you. As you move around, different Pokémon appear depending on where you are and what time it is.

The idea of the game is to encourage exploration and travel (i.e. walking) in the real world making it an augmented reality (AR) game. Players actually have to go to the physical location to play. This game is what players have dreamed about since Pokémon came out in the late 90’s. The idea that Pokémon are real and inhabit our world is very enticing.

An Augmented Reality Pidgey lurking in our stacks

An Augmented Reality Pidgey lurking in our stacks.

The game also transforms local landmarks and businesses into Pokéstops and Gyms. Most likely your library is a Pokéstop in the world. This is where players come to refill their necessary supplies (like Pokéballs and other items). Reach out to those players by advertising that you are a stop! Let the players know they can refill and collect valuable Eggs.

Or, you can play along! Then you can set up your stop to lure Pokémon. This means you put out an item (in game) that will increase the amount of Pokémon at your Pokéstop. These Pokémon then can be seen and caught by any player nearby. Use it during a typically slow period of your day to get more foot traffic, and then use your creativity to turn them into a library patron! Drop a lure before your summer reading program as a lead in to your event. Make sure to advertise your lure beforehand to increase participation.

The popularity of this game is exploding. Make that impact a positive one by embracing the game and its players. Pokémon GO could be a memorable experience for you and your patrons!

Now, I’m off to find Mew!

Pokémon, (gotta catch them all) it’s you and me
I know it’s my destiny
Pokémon, oh, you’re my best friend
In a world we must defend

Indie Author Day 2016

Libraries across North America are gearing up to host local events for the first annual Indie Author Day. SELF-e, a collaboration between Library Journal and BiblioLabs, is the driving force Indie-Author-Day-300x226behind Indie Author Day. What is Indie Author Day? It is a soon-to-be annual event commencing this fall that will recognize and support independent authors.

It can be challenging for authors to get discovered and find a foothold in the publishing world. However, indie publishing is on the rise, and indie authors can also work with their local library to build support and a fan base within their own communities. On the flip side, libraries are urged to support local authors. This is where Indie Author Day comes in. Authors connecting with their local libraries and libraries supporting local authors forms a critical relationship.

Libraries big and small are encouraged to participate in Indie Author Day and host programs. Libraries hosting this event may offer book readings, book talks, discussion panels, book signings, workshops, presentations, networking, and more!

In addition to the programs hosted by all the participating libraries, an online gathering will be held at 1:00 PM (Central) with writers, publishers, and other leaders in the industry. This will bring libraries and indie communities together, and the hour long gathering will also provide information, advice, and inspiration.

The 2016 Indie Author Day will be held on October 8, 2016. For more information, visit their website at: http://indieauthorday.com/

For more information on hosting and planning an event, visit http://self-e.libraryjournal.com/indieauthorday

Registering to host a local event for Indie Author Day can be done at: http://indieauthorday.com/register/

“YALSA’s Teens’ Top Ten” Nominees for 2016

Teens' Top TenYALSA has posted the list of the 2016 Teens’ Top Ten Nominees. The 26 books on this list are the favorites from 2015, nominated and chosen by teens. Voting takes place between August 15 and Teen Read Week (October 9-15, 2016), with the 10 winners being announced the week after Teen Read Week.

Now is a great time to have your teens start reading the nominees so they are ready to vote when the time comes. This will also get teens reading during the summer, which is the ultimate goal. Continue reading

Grants for Libraries

dollar sign

Best Buy Foundation Community Grants

Application deadline: July 1

The Best Buy Foundation is on a mission to provide teens with places and opportunities to develop technology skills that will inspire future education and career choices. They are provide Community Grants to local and regional (within 50 miles of a Best Buy location) nonprofit organizations that provide teens with places and opportunities to develop 21st century technology skills, including: computer programming, digital imaging, music production, robotics, and gaming and mobile app development. The average grant amount is $5,000 and grants will not exceed $10,000. You can review their criteria, take the eligibility quiz, and apply at: https://corporate.bestbuy.com/community-grants-page/

First Book

Application deadline: Ongoing

First Book is a nonprofit providing free and discounted books and educational resources to schools and programs serving children from low-income families. Registration is required to ensure only qualifying organizations participate. Sign up at: http://www.fbmarketplace.org/register

Mazda Foundation

Application deadline: July 1

The Mazda Foundation awards grants to programs promoting education and literacy, environmental conservation, cross-cultural understanding, social welfare, and scientific research. Organizations are required to have a 501(c)(3) designation. Find out more and apply here: http://www.mazdafoundation.org/Grant_Guidelines.html

North Dakota Humanities Council Quick Grants

Application deadline: Ongoing

NDHC Quick Grants ($1,500 or less) support direct program costs of humanities projects that bring historical, cultural, or ethical perspectives to bear on issues of interest in our communities. They support events that engage participants in thinking critically, promote better understanding of ourselves and others, are conducted in a spirit of open and informed inquiry, provide multiple viewpoints, and which involve partnerships between community organizations, cultural institutions, and scholars in the humanities. Read their guidelines and apply at: http://www.ndhumanities.org/quick-grants.html

Kinder Morgan Foundation

Application deadline: 10th of each month

The Kinder Morgan Foundation’s mission is to provide today’s youth with opportunities to learn and grow. Their goal is to help today’s science, math, and music students become the engineers, educators, and musicians who will support diverse communities for many years to come. They fund programs that promote the academic and artistic interests of young people in the cities and towns where Kindred Morgan operates. Grants range between $1,000 and $5,000. Eligibility requirements and application forms are accessible on their site: http://www.kindermorgan.com/pages/community/km_foundation_guidelines.aspx

This article originally appeared in the May, 2016 issue of the State Library’s Flickertale (PDF).