Monthly Archives: July 2016

NDLCC Standards Compliance: Board Orientation

Guest post by Mary Soucie, State Librarian (first published in the July 2016 issue of Flickertale)

This month, we are going to explore another of the NDLCC Standards: Board Orientation. As a former library director, a former public library trustee and a former regional library system trustee, I cannot stress enough how important it is to have a strong orientation for new board members.

It is critical that you share important information with trustees from the get-go. While orientations may vary some from library to library, there are some crucial elements that should be included. It is important to share the library’s vision and mission statements so that trustees understand the values and culture of the library. If your vision and mission statement don’t reflect the organizational values and culture, it may be time to look at an update to both statements. It is also important to share the library’s budget and a copy of all library policies.

I liked to create a binder for trustees that included our vision and mission statements; copies of the current policies; an organizational chart; the budget; an overview of the responsibilities of trustees and the responsibilities of the director; a copy of the most recent library newsletter; a welcome letter from the director; a schedule of board meetings; an address list of all board members, which also included terms; and a copy of the minutes from the last three meetings. Also included was an overview of open meetings and other pertinent local, state and federal laws.

I believe that the library director should conduct the orientation with assistance from the board president. It is also appropriate for the director to conduct the orientation on his/her own. I do not recommend that the board president present the orientation without the director.

As a trustee who was also a library director, it was important for me to have an orientation so I would know how that board operated. As a new trustee on the Regional Library System board, I needed to know the committee structure, expectations and responsibilities of the trustees. It was important for me to learn from the organization’s perspective what the role of the trustee was for that particular organization and how business was conducted at the board meetings.

Compliance with the standards by July 1, 2017, will be required for any public library that wishes to apply for Library Vision grants. If you need assistance creating an orientation for new board members or have any questions about the standards, please contact your Library Development Specialist. If you’re not sure who your LDS is, you can find out here: http://library.nd.gov/fieldservices.html

NDLCC Standards Compliance: Reader’s Advisory

Guest post by Mary Soucie, State Librarian (first published in the June 2016 issue of Flickertale)

After this year’s public library annual report, Library Development Manager Eric Stroshane completed an analysis of how our public libraries are doing in regards to being in compliance with the North Dakota Library Coordinating Council (NDLCC) Standards for Public Libraries. There are categories that all libraries are in compliance with. We are going to highlight the areas that don’t have 100% compliance.

The first topic we are going to write about is Reader’s Advisory. Reader’s Advisory (RA) is the act of recommending both fiction and nonfiction titles to patrons through direct and indirect methods.

books1[1]Direct is pretty straight and word forward. A patron asks for a good book, a mystery book, a self-help book… insert any request here. A librarian or staff member directs the patron to one or more titles that will fit their needs. Indirect includes everything from book displays to booklists/pathfinders to bookmarks.

In 2014, Library Journal published an article entitled “The State of Reader’s Advisory.” They identified four points of service where RA takes place:

In-person RA takes place 85% of the time at the reference desk and 59% at the circulation desk. Self-directed RA is also highly popular, with 94% of libraries creating book displays, for example, and 75% offering book lists. Book-oriented programs are widespread, too: the survey shows that book clubs (89%) and author visits (86%) are held at most libraries. The fourth point of service was digital: 79% of libraries provide read-alikes or other such tips on their websites, and a little less than half, recommendations via social media.

You can read the rest of the article at: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2014/02/library-services/the-state-of-readers-advisory/#_

I’ve taken advantage of RA via social networking several times and I love it. I’m not sure if any of our ND libraries are offering this but if you are, please be sure to let me know. One way to provide RA via social networking is to ask a reader to provide the last title they’ve read and then librarians recommend 3-5 titles based on that title. Another is to share book reviews via Twitter or Facebook. I know we do have some librarians doing this.

I think more of our libraries are providing Reader’s Advisory Services than indicated by the annual report. Hopefully, this article has helped you better identify the ways that you are providing RA that you didn’t identify as such.

If you have questions about the standards, please contact any member of the Library Development Team.

Hooray! Your Library’s a Pokéstop!

Pokestop

The North Dakota State Library is a Pokéstop and your library likely is, too!

Guest post by Shari Mosser, ND State Library

I wanna be the very best. Like no one ever was!

Lately, you might have seen random people outside your library – singly or in groups. The people range in age, background and lifestyles. The only thing in common is that they are usually holding a phone in front of their face. Sometimes they congregate for a half hour or so and then walk (or drive/bike) away. Others will just keep walking by or abruptly switch directions with excited looks on their faces.

These people are probably playing the new, popular, free-to-play game called Pokémon GO! It is so popular it is on the verge of overtaking the daily number of users that are on Twitter. Pokémon GO uses your phone’s GPS and clock to detect where you are in the game (so real world locations!) and make little “monsters” appear around you. As you move around, different Pokémon appear depending on where you are and what time it is.

The idea of the game is to encourage exploration and travel (i.e. walking) in the real world making it an augmented reality (AR) game. Players actually have to go to the physical location to play. This game is what players have dreamed about since Pokémon came out in the late 90’s. The idea that Pokémon are real and inhabit our world is very enticing.

An Augmented Reality Pidgey lurking in our stacks

An Augmented Reality Pidgey lurking in our stacks.

The game also transforms local landmarks and businesses into Pokéstops and Gyms. Most likely your library is a Pokéstop in the world. This is where players come to refill their necessary supplies (like Pokéballs and other items). Reach out to those players by advertising that you are a stop! Let the players know they can refill and collect valuable Eggs.

Or, you can play along! Then you can set up your stop to lure Pokémon. This means you put out an item (in game) that will increase the amount of Pokémon at your Pokéstop. These Pokémon then can be seen and caught by any player nearby. Use it during a typically slow period of your day to get more foot traffic, and then use your creativity to turn them into a library patron! Drop a lure before your summer reading program as a lead in to your event. Make sure to advertise your lure beforehand to increase participation.

The popularity of this game is exploding. Make that impact a positive one by embracing the game and its players. Pokémon GO could be a memorable experience for you and your patrons!

Now, I’m off to find Mew!

Pokémon, (gotta catch them all) it’s you and me
I know it’s my destiny
Pokémon, oh, you’re my best friend
In a world we must defend

Indie Author Day 2016

Libraries across North America are gearing up to host local events for the first annual Indie Author Day. SELF-e, a collaboration between Library Journal and BiblioLabs, is the driving force Indie-Author-Day-300x226behind Indie Author Day. What is Indie Author Day? It is a soon-to-be annual event commencing this fall that will recognize and support independent authors.

It can be challenging for authors to get discovered and find a foothold in the publishing world. However, indie publishing is on the rise, and indie authors can also work with their local library to build support and a fan base within their own communities. On the flip side, libraries are urged to support local authors. This is where Indie Author Day comes in. Authors connecting with their local libraries and libraries supporting local authors forms a critical relationship.

Libraries big and small are encouraged to participate in Indie Author Day and host programs. Libraries hosting this event may offer book readings, book talks, discussion panels, book signings, workshops, presentations, networking, and more!

In addition to the programs hosted by all the participating libraries, an online gathering will be held at 1:00 PM (Central) with writers, publishers, and other leaders in the industry. This will bring libraries and indie communities together, and the hour long gathering will also provide information, advice, and inspiration.

The 2016 Indie Author Day will be held on October 8, 2016. For more information, visit their website at: http://indieauthorday.com/

For more information on hosting and planning an event, visit http://self-e.libraryjournal.com/indieauthorday

Registering to host a local event for Indie Author Day can be done at: http://indieauthorday.com/register/