Monthly Archives: April 2019

Fake News Browser Extensions

Thank you for visiting.

This resource has moved!

It can now be found on the North Dakota State Library’s LibGuides: https://library-nd.libguides.com/fakenews

We’d hate to see you leave empty-handed, so here is an image of a man riding a bicycle down the steps of the U.S. Capitol (courtesy of the Library of Congress).

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“A perilous ride,” 1884

YA Programming: Resources & NDLCC Standards

NDLCC Standards

Programming is a vital service that public libraries provide. Because of this, the North Dakota Library Coordinating Council (NDLCC) Standards for Public Libraries includes programming requirements. Consult the Standards for additional information.

Definition

So what exactly is a young adult program? Well, the federal definition (slightly reworded) is as follows:

Any planned event for which the primary audience is young adults (age 12-18) and which introduces the attendees to any of the broad range of library services or activities for young adults or which directly provides information to participants.

Young adult programs may cover use of the library, library services, or library tours. They programs may also provide cultural, recreational, or educational information, often designed to meet a specific social need.

Examples of young adult programs include board game nights, Nerf battles, video game tournaments, escape rooms, coding clubs, trivia, selfie contests, etc.

Young adult programs can be held on-site or off-site and be sponsored or co-sponsored by the library. Young adult programs sponsored by other groups that use library facilities are not considered a program of the library.

If young adult programs are offered as a series, each program in the series can be counted. For example, a coding club offered twice a month should be counted as 24 programs.

Resources

There are a lot of resources available online relating to library programming. It can be a little overwhelming to even know where to start. Below is a list of resources that make great starting points.

Young Adult Programming Resources:

General Resources (for all ages):

Duties of the Library Board & Library Director

The relationship between the library board and the director works best when each party’s roles and responsibilities are clearly understood and adhered to.

The board is primarily responsible for the big picture; the director administers the day to day operations of the library.

The chart below outlines the basic duties of the board and the director in relation to one another.

  Library Board Library Director
Bylaws Adopt bylaws for board procedures. Develop and review bylaws in consultation with board.
Staff Employ a competent and qualified director. Review the director’s organizational structure, identifying lines of authority and responsibility. Act as technical advisor for the board. Employ and supervise all other staff members. Make recommendations on organizational structure to the board.
Policy Determine and adopt written policies to govern the operation and program of the library. Recommend and draft policies for board action. Carry out adopted policies, delegating responsibilities to staff as needed.
Planning/ capital projects In cooperation with director and staff, develop a long-range plan for commitment of resources to meet the changing needs of the community. Work together with board and staff in preparation of a long-range plan by projecting needs and trends in library service.
Budget Review the annual budget to determine its adequacy for meeting goals and objectives. Work actively for public and official support. Explore all possible revenue sources. Prepare the annual budget draft to achieve objectives as identified with the board. Supply facts and figures to aid in interpreting the library’s financial needs. Attend budget hearings as a resource person.
Finance Review and approve monthly financial statements in context of the annual budget. Prepare and present monthly financial statements and bills for board action.
Public relations Establish, support, and participate in a planned public relations program. Interpret the library’s role and plans to other community boards and committees. Maintain an active program of public relations and public information. Represent the library on other community boards and committees.
Library legislation Know local and state laws. Actively support state and national library legislation. Know local and state laws. Keep board informed of pending legislation, library trends, developments, and standards.
Advocacy Report regularly to governing officials and the general public. Report regularly to the library board, local government officials, the general public, and the state library agency.

Adapted from:

  • Pearlmutter, Jane, and Paul Nelson. Small Public Library Management. Chicago: American Library Association, 2012. Print.

Additional Resources: