Author Archives: Stephanie Kom

A New Session

State Historical Society of North Dakota, William E. (Bill) Shemorry Photograph Collection (1-28-46-1)

State Historical Society of North Dakota, William E. (Bill) Shemorry Photograph Collection (1-28-46-1)

The governor will present his budget to the legislature today. One of the popular topics that has come up in recent years is oil revenue. This isn’t something new as demonstrated in the above photo from 1952. A Williston  City Commissioner, Neuman Ditsworth, leads a protest against legislative action on a oil tax bill. You can read more about it on Digital Horizons.

Take a few minutes to explore the new Digital Horizons website and our new content! The North Dakota Memories collection has new items from the Pembina County Historical Society and the North Dakota County and Town Histories collection has a number of new books for your searching ease.

New content for County and Town Histories

I will have some new books uploaded later today to the County and Town Histories Collection on Digital Horizons. There is also new folk art content in North Dakota Memories from the Pembina County Historical Society. A great way to get updates for these collections is to subscribe to the RSS updates as seen in the upper right corner of the landing page image below. The collection links above will take you to the landing pages. You can do this for any of the collections in Digital Horizons. Check them out!

Landing page for  North Dakota County and Town Histories

Landing page for North Dakota County and Town Histories

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Bloomfield
 Branchaud's General Store in Pembina by Antoinette Branchaud Schwob

Branchaud’s General Store in Pembina by Antoinette Branchaud Schwob

Vikur Lutheran Church (Mountain, N.D.) by J.S. Benedictson

Vikur Lutheran Church (Mountain, N.D.) by J.S. Benedictson

It could be worse

So I found myself grumbling about the snow and cold today. Then I thought–It could be worse. Here are a few photos from Digital Horizons to prove my point. Click on the links in the captions for more information.

Sebastian Krumm house, Hague N.D., after 1966 blizzard. State Historical Society of North Dakota (C1475)

Sebastian Krumm house, Hague N.D., after 1966 blizzard. State Historical Society of North Dakota (C1475)

Digging out after the big blizzard, Milton, North Dakota, 1893 -- Fred Hultstrand History In Pictures Collection, NDIRS-NDSU, Fargo (2028.475)

Digging out after the big blizzard, Milton, North Dakota, 1893 — Fred Hultstrand History In Pictures Collection, NDIRS-NDSU, Fargo (2028.475)

Buried car on Broadway during 1944 blizzard, Fargo, N.D. -- Institute for Regional Studies, NDSU (2022.7.2)

Buried car on Broadway during 1944 blizzard, Fargo, N.D. — Institute for Regional Studies, NDSU (2022.7.2)

A Fargo woman with a shovel digging out of her house -- Fargo Public Library Photograph Collection 2065

A Fargo woman with a shovel digging out of her house — Fargo Public Library Photograph Collection 2065

Digital Horizons – New Collection featuring Pembina County Historical Society items

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We recently partnered with the Pembina County Historical Society to bring you a snapshot of what the Society has to offer. The new collection, North Dakota Memories, will include North Dakota items that are scanned from collections not housed by the North Dakota State Library. I have started adding items that I scanned in June from the Pembina County Historical Society museum in Cavalier. To this point, the Pioneer Women’s Histories have been uploaded to the Digital Horizons North Dakota Memories collection. This selection of materials contains biographies of pioneer women in Pembina County that was gathered in the 1930’s and 1940’s as part of the WPA program. The text is searchable and contains information on the life of the pioneers, genealogy, and history of the towns and settlements.

I have a lot more material to add so keep your eyes open for more images, artwork and objects from Pembina County in the North Dakota Memories collection!

If you know of a collection that could be part of North Dakota Memories, please contact me-Stephanie Kom at sbaltzer@nd.gov or 701-328-4629. We will provide equipment and training for a period of time and catalog and upload the objects for display on Digital Horizons.

A taste of things to come. Funeral procession in Cavalier, N.D. early 20th century.

A taste of things to come. Funeral procession in Cavalier, N.D. early 20th century.

DPLA and North Dakota materials

Digital Horizons is a great place to find North Dakota related images and information but there are a lot of places that hold North Dakota content that would surprise you. DPLA pulls in metadata from hundreds of institutions across the United States. The National Archives, The University of Southern California, the New York Public Library, Boston Public Library and many more have North Dakota related  images available for discovery through DPLA. You have to click on the link in the DPLA record to get to the actual record in the home archive. DPLA is a one stop shop for searching North Dakota images held by non-North Dakota entities. The images below are all from the National Archives and have unrestricted access and use rights.

GrandForksFlood28681

Grand Forks, ND, May, 1997 — Aerial view of Grand Forks neighborhood and a bridge crossing the flooded Red River of the North http://dp.la/item/5ab553d8306799ffe9ece06f3f27b7c7

1937 Homestead

Homestead of A. Alin taken in 1937 http://dp.la/item/6fd63db9e20dff2fd5433942601748f7

(April , 1997Grand Forks, ND)- Aerial view of Downtown Grand Forks.

Grand Forks, ND, May, 1997 — Aerial view of Grand Forks the flooded Red River of the North with burned buildings in the foreground http://dp.la/item/8502d955bf0b451f9cb135e911d0daec

 

New Digital Horizons Website

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Digital Horizons launched its new website last week! It now supports enhanced viewing and searching capabilities. For objects with many pages, you can switch to the Page Flip View and view it like an actual book rather than clicking on each individual page. You can browse all the collections or choose one collection and browse. There is also a handy feature that will send you updates on the collections that you choose to follow.

CountyTownsnip

This is the County and Town Histories landing page. You can see recent additions on the right and subscribe to update.

In our collection of County and Town Histories, you can conduct an advanced search using counties or towns as your search term. There is also faceted searching on the left side of your results screen that will allow you to narrow your results. It is limited as it will only show you the top 10 items in each facet for the collection.

facets

This is a screenshot of the faceted searching box that will appear on the left side of your screen beneath the collection boxes.

This is just a broad overview of some of the enhancements seen with the new Digital Horizons website. Please contact me-Stephanie Kom at sbaltzer@nd.gov or 701-328-4629 if you have any questions or comments. Happy hunting!

Family History Month

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October is Family History Month in the United States. Many people think that family history is something that is buried in the past and requires research. Research can be a large part of family history but family history is something that can be very much in the present. There are a number of ways you can go about documenting your family history without traditionally defined research.

1. Interview a family member about their memories and experiences of growing up. This can be as formal as you want it. It can be nice to have a recording of the interview so people can hear the stories for themselves from the people telling them.

2. Invite some relatives over for a family meal to reconnect.

3. Document your own stories and experiences.

4. Call some relatives that you don’t see often.

5. Organize and label your photographs–better yet, get into your computer and organize your digital memories and find a way to preserve them. People often think that once something is digital, it will last forever. This is not the case with digital objects–they are often more vulnerable to loss through technological failures, mislabeling, and storage on different media types among other things. Consider using a backup service like Carbonite so there is a copy of your pictures somewhere other than your home. Follow the hotlink for some recommendations on cloud backup services.

6. Attend a webinar to get some tips and tricks for starting your research.

7. Put a scrapbook or recipe book together. My uncle put a recipe book together that contained all of my grandmother’s favorite family recipes. It is the cookbook I use most often.

8. For all of you that need an excuse to quilt, put a family themed quilt together. Quilts are treasured heirlooms in my family.

There are scads of other things you can do so get creative. These can also lend themselves to library programming ideas throughout the year. Genealogy/Family History is the second most popular hobby in the U.S. behind gardening so there are a lot of people out there who want to share their story. Go find them for Family History Month.

 

DPLA apps

FindDPLA WikiDPLA

I recently noticed that some new apps have been added to the DPLA site. This reminded me of a DPLA app that I had been meaning to try out that works with Wikipedia. I found not one but two apps available that pull relevant DPLA content into your Wikipedia searches.

FindDPLA pulls content that is directly related to your search and seems to be compatible with Windows Explorer, Chrome and Firefox.  FindDPLA is easy to setup. You just have to follow the directions by clicking through. They are working on a fix for the step where you have to click the shield in your URL box in order to run the script successfully. It doesn’t appear that you need to perform that step in Explorer. You will see the results of your DPLA connection at the top of your Wikipedia page as seen below.findDPLAim

WikipeDPLA is a Google Chrome extension that pulls up similar topics to the one that you searched on in the form of links to DPLA. You just follow the links on the app library and may have to sign into you Google account for the extension. The results of the DPLA connections using this app are seen below:

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You can read more about these two apps in the DPLA App Library. There are a number of other apps available as well including one that tweets out images of historical cats—Who doesn’t need an app that sends out historical cat images?

Digital Horizons

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As you may or may not be aware–the North Dakota State Library (NDSL) began participating in Digital Horizons about a year ago.  The previous link will take you to our current website where you can read up on the consortium if you aren’t familiar with the local institutions that are currently participating. NDSL is currently scanning county and town history books so that they are available online and are keyword searchable.

If you are a user of Digital Horizons, be on the lookout for some changes in the upcoming weeks. We will launch a new website that will be using the most up to date CONTENTdm software. This will make searches and viewing easier. There is also new content. We are hoping for an early October launch and I will keep you informed as changes occur.

Permission to digitize

EU flag

So I was scanning my news feed and came across an article entitled, “Libraries may digitize books without permission and immediately began clicking the link. As the page came up, I realized that I had neglected to finish reading the title which further stated, “EU top court rules

So European libraries may digitize books and make them available at electronic reading points without first gaining consent of the copyright holder. The Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) made the ruling last week. The CJEU just clarified the scope of the copyright directive and its decision does not finalize the dispute. It is for the national court to decide the case in accordance with the CJEU’s decision, which is binding on other national courts before which a similar issue is raised.

While there are some expected setbacks in the ruling itself—like restricting them to reading points within the library and no downloading or printing of the books—it is a huge benefit to libraries and their attempts to keep up with the digital movement. I can’t say what this will mean in American courts but it opens the theoretical door.