Author Archives: Trevor Martinson

Robots!

CodeDak logo

At the 2017 Summer Summits, Library Development staff presented on coding and coding clubs; and robots, too! Several robots were featured in our coding themed presentation (the slides can be viewed here); but we were only able to demonstrate one of the robots (the Sphero). But never fear, YouTube is here!

Through the power of YouTube, you can see all of these robots in action and learn more about them in the process. Enjoy!

Sphero

 

Kano

 

Codeybot

 

Dash and Dot

 

The Finch

 

Ozobots

 

Lego WeDo 2.0

 

Cubelets

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Get Your Library Ready for the Solar Eclipse

On Monday, August 21, 2017, the Moon will pass in front of the sun and cast its shadow will across North America, resulting in a solar eclipse.

Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Nebraska, Missouri, Tennessee, South Carolina, and parts of a few other states will be lucky enough to witness the total solar eclipse (a spectacle like this hasn’t been visible in the continental United States in just under 40 years). The rest of us will experience a partial solar eclipse (the moon will cover part of the sun).

Check out this cool video by NASA that predicts the trajectory of the total and partial solar eclipse:

 

Some are calling this the celestial event of the century. Don’t let your library miss out on this great opportunity!

Here are some great resources to get your library ready for the solar eclipse:

Book Lists – Sci Fi & Fantasy

Looking for a good science fiction/ fantasy book to read? Looking for a good science fiction/ fantasy book to recommend to your patrons? Looking for a good science fiction/ fantasy book to add to your collection? If so, here are some great lists for you!

Book Lists – 100 Must Reads

Looking for a good book to read? Looking for a good book to recommend to your patrons? Looking for a good book to add to your collection? If so, here are some great lists for you!

Weeding Resources

Weeding, also known as culling or de-selection, is a process of removing library materials form collections based on a certain criteria. Weeding is a necessary process that libraries continuously perform.

Weeding is vital because it saves shelf space (removes overstuffed shelves and creates room for new books), makes it easier to browse the collection and thus saves time, removes outdated material, makes the collection more appealing, etc.

Librarians are often hesitant to weed for many different reasons. Don’t let any hesitations get in the way of weeding; you don’t want your collection to suffer because of it. One such hesitation is the potential reaction from the public/ patrons. They may look at the process and say, “Why is the library throwing out books?” Transparency is needed to avoid any negative publicity. Get the word out before the project begins, and explain the process and why weeding is essential.

It is important for librarians and patrons alike to remember that libraries do not have unlimited space; and libraries are not museums or warehouses.

If you need guidance, THE definitive resource on weeding is CREW: A Weeding Manual for Modern Libraries, which was created by the Texas State Library and Archives Commission.  The Crew manual explains why weeding is important, it covers the weeding process, and it also offers weeding assistance on specific categories (nonfiction, fiction, graphic novels, periodicals, children’s books, young adult fiction, etc.).

Before starting a weeding project, you should make sure your library has an updated weeding policy. One is available on the State Library’s website (and in the resources below).

If you ever need assistance with weeding, don’t hesitate to contact your Library Development representative (and we’ll come running!).

Now that we’ve covered some weeding basics, it’s time to start weeding! Here are some great resources on weeding:

Videos/ Webinars/ Tutorials on Weeding:

Recommended Reading:

  • Allen, M. (2010). Weed ’em and reap: The art of weeding to avoid criticism. Library Media Connection. Retrieved from http://bit.ly/V2Nx0P
  • Chant, I. (2015). The art of weeding: Collection management. Library Journal. Retrieved from http://bit.ly/2sqVUqc
  • Vnuk, R. (2016). Weeding without worry: Transparency and communication help ease weeding woes. American Libraries. Retrieved from http://bit.ly/1Zi73Rm

What to Do with Weeded Books:

Factors for Weeding:

  • Consider things like age, last circulation date, number of circulations, condition, multiple copies, etc.
  • Also, you can use the acronym MUSTIE – Misleading, Ugly, Superseded, Trivial, Irrelevant, and Elsewhere (more information on MUSTIE can be found in the Crew manual)

Inspiring Quotes on Weeding:

  • “A good library collection is like a good haircut. It’s not what you cut–it’s what you leave.” – Anne Felix (CREW: A Weeding Manual for Modern Libraries)
  • “…it is better to have worthless books in the trash than have trash on your shelves.” – Melissa Allen (Weed ‘Em and Reap: The Art of Weeding to Avoid Criticism)
  • “Overflowing shelves give an overall impression of chaos and make it harder for people to fine the resources they really need.” – Melissa Allen (Weed ‘Em and Reap: The Art of Weeding to Avoid Criticism)
  • “…lack of funds to replace outdated or worn items is never an excuse for not weeding.” – Jeanette Larson (CREW: A Weeding Manual for Modern Libraries)
  • “Try to avoid a situation where weeding is a massive project that is done once in ten years requiring you to weed hundreds of items. It is much better to make weeding an ongoing process…” – Melissa Allen (Weed ‘Em and Reap: The Art of Weeding to Avoid Criticism)
  • “Patrons lose patience trying to find items that are crammed onto overcrowded shelves.” – CREW: A Weeding Manual for Modern Libraries
  • “Circulation can be increased by simply making the shelves look more attractive and user-friendly, even if there are actually fewer books.” – CREW: A Weeding Manual for Modern Libraries

Readers Advisory Resources

Readers Advisory is a service libraries offer that includes helping readers locate materials through recommendations, book lists, displays, social networking, and other means. Basically, readers advisory means recommending books to patrons.

All libraries provide readers advisory services whether they realize it or not. It can be done “informally” (by verbally recommending books to patrons) and “formally” (by using displays and handouts).

If your library has recommended items to patrons either “formally” or “informally,” your library has done readers advisory. (Hint: remember this when filling out your library’s annual report)

If you would like to expand your library’s readers advisory services or if you would like to learn more about this service, here are some great resources:

Resources specifically for teens/ young adults:

Book Lists – Summer is Coming

Looking for a good book to read? Looking for a good book to recommend to your patrons? Looking for a good book to add to your collection? If so, here are some great lists for you!

It’s still technically spring, but summer is coming (Game of Thrones fans will appreciate this image); so here are some books to get you through spring and ready for summer:

State Library Has A Drone!

Attention North Dakota libraries! The State Library now has a drone! The DJI Phantom 3: Drone Kit is available in KitKeeper. The kit includes a drone and an iPad for shooting and editing digital video. The kit only circulates to public and school libraries in North Dakota, and it be checked out up to 8 weeks. To reserve the drone kit or to learn more about it, visit KitKeeper at: http://www.eventkeeper.com/kitkeeper/index.cfm?curOrg=nodak

drone

Book Lists – YA

Looking for a good YA book to read? Looking for a good YA book to recommend to your patrons? Looking for a good YA book to add to your collection? If so, here are some great lists for you!

Adult Programming Resources

The following is a list of resources relating to adult programming and the 2017 Renewal & Development session “Adults Only: Adult Programming in Public Libraries.”

Resources for “Adults Only: Adult Programming in Public Libraries” (2017 R&D Session)

State Library Resources

Other Resources