Category Archives: Education

Free and Legal Stock Images

Finding the perfect picture to put on your website, brochure, or Facebook event can be tricky, and it gets even more difficult if you’re making sure your photos are legal to use. That’s right, legally, you can’t use any picture you find on Google Images. Using these photos opens your library up to possible lawsuits for copyright infringement. Instead, look for photos that fall into Public Domain or have a Creative Commons license.

Public Domain: The person who created this work has waived their rights to the photo. This means that you can copy, change, distribute, and perform the work for commercial purposes without asking permission.

Creative Commons Licenses: These licenses allow creators to waive and reserve certain rights in regards to their work. This may include if the image can be used for commercial purposes, if it needs creator attribution, and so on.

A guide for helpful information regarding stock photos can be found here.

The following websites are full of free and ready-to-use photos (as long as you follow the licensing restrictions) to make your library marketing a little more beautiful:

Website:

Free No User Account No Attribution
Unsplash X X

X

Pexels

X X X
Pixabay X X

X

Gratisography

X X X
Burst X Low Resolution: No account

High Resolution: Account

X

Creative Commons

X X X

Negative Space

X X

X

Free Images X Account Needed

Various Usage Rights

Freepik (Graphics)

Most are free X Attribution to Freepik
Freerange X Account Needed

X

Vecteezy (Graphics) Most are free X

Attribution to Vecteezy

This post was written with sources from Angela Hursh’s blog “Super Library Marketing.

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Active Shooter Resources

Shootings are an unfortunate and frightening reality in today’s world. Statistically speaking, it is unlikely you will experience an active shooter situation, but that does not negate their seriousness. Planning and being informed can save lives.

There are a few simple things you can do at the office or at home to better prepare yourself.

  • Be informed – stay current on procedures and other relevant information
  • Be prepared – create a plan & participate in trainings
  • Be alert – pay attention to your surroundings, trust your instincts, & if you see something, say something (report suspicious activity to the local authorities)
  • Run. Hide. Fight.
Active_Shooter

Run. Hide. Fight. (Active Shooter: How to Respond Poster – Homeland Security)

There is a plethora of active shooter information and resources available online. Below is a listing of some of the best of the best.

More Information:

Handouts:

Videos:


Books on Library Security:

 

Public Library and School Library Collaboration Toolkit

The “Public Library and School Library Collaboration Toolkit” has been released. Members of AASL (American Association of School Librarians), ALSC (Association for Library Service to Children), and YALSA (Young Adult Library Services Association) worked together for three years to create a document that benefits both school librarians and public librarians by encouraging them working together collaboratively.

This toolkit provides 5 chapters full of research, information, and examples for librarians to look towards when beginning collaboration initiatives between school and public libraries. There are also scrips and tips for both school and public librarians on how to overcome their different institutional hurdles.

Working together makes libraries and communities stronger. Look through the toolkit here.

ALSC put together a brief explanation of the toolkit here and has a list of successful past partnerships between school and public libraries that can be found here.

Telescope Kit Resources

One of the many STEM kits the North Dakota State Library has available through KitKeeper are 3 telescope kits. Each kit includes: 1 Orion StarBlast telescope, 1 Orion EZ Finder II red-dot sight, 1 copy of Night Watch: A Practical Guide to Viewing the Universe by Terence Dickinson,  5 eyepieces (6mm, 6mm, 12.5mm, 17mm, & 20mm), 1 2x Barlow lens, and 4 filters (moon, red, blue, & yellow).

The kit also includes a guide, which has a list of a few potential activities libraries can plan to go along with this kit. The sky is the limit (pun intended) on activities relating to telescopes, astronomy, and the universe, and this list functions as a starting point for ideas. All of the ideas listed on the guide have resources available online, which can be accessed at the links below along with some resources for the telescope itself.

Telescope:

Stars:

The Moon:

Solar System Scale:

Planets:

Word Search:

Book Odors and How to Handle Them

What’s the best way to remove the smell of smoke, perfume, or other unfortunate scents from your library materials? It’s a common problem in every type of library. In order to salvage your books, you’ll need a bin with a tight seal; stand the books upright in the bin to let the pages fan out and ventilate. Feel free to try different methods for different smells, but make sure to never spray or rub any of the deodorizers directly on the materials—there should always be a layer of separation. If you are deodorizing materials of archival value, only use the last method listed.

  1. Put coffee into knee-high hose and tie the hose in a knot. This keeps the coffee from getting too messy, but it removes the odor as well. Cover the bin and leave for several days. The coffee will need to be replaced every 6 months.

 

  1. Two similar options are to leave a box of baking soda open in the bin or to leave dryer sheets open and in the bin. Again, these will need to sit for several days and be replaced as needed.

 

  1. One of the most highly recommended options for deodorizing materials is to use non-perfumed, non-clumping cat litter (use the cheapest one you can find). Pour an inch or two layer on the bottom of the bin and cover it in paper towels; set the books upright on the paper towels and cover with the lid. Check the materials once a week, and if the smell is not gone after a month, replace the cat litter. This is the only method listed that is approved by the National Archives for use on archival materials.

Ben’s Guide

Have you heard about Ben’s Guide?

Ben’s Guide is a free, online resource from the Government Publishing Office (GPO). Ben’s Guide to the U.S. Government, or Ben’s Guide for short, is a fun, interactive resource designed to inform children, students, parents, educators, and everyone else about the Federal Government.

The logo/ mascot for Ben’s Guide is an animated rendition of Benjamin Franklin. Join Ben as he leads you across the many aspects of the website, including a government glossary, learning adventures, a section dedicated to citizenship, and games!

Ben_250pxOn the homepage, you will be invited by Ben to “go on a learning adventure!” Ben’s Guide divides its learning adventures into age groups: 4-8 (apprentice), 9-13 (journeyperson), and 14+ (master). Individuals can simply click on their age group and have information catered to them.

Ben’s Guide also contains resources for parents and educators, including (but not limited to) infographics, lesson plans, and links to other kid-friendly and educator-friendly government websites.

GPO, established in 1861, produces and distributes documents from Federal agencies and Congress, as well as providing permanent and free access for the public to these Federal documents through its Federal Digital System, the Federal Depository Library Program, and the U.S. Government Bookstore. And to top it all off, GPO provides free access, learning, and resources with Ben’s Guide.

What are you waiting for? Go check out Ben’s Guide today!

Fanfiction in Libraries

Fanfiction in libraries!?! I’m sure many of you are thinking “not in my library!” but with the growing popularity of fanfiction and pop culture this is an easy programming idea. During the North Dakota Library Association’s annual conference Dr. Aimee Rogers, from the University of North Dakota, and Justine Sprenger, from the Grand Forks Public Library, gave the presentation Fanfiction: Why you should be a fan! Through this presentation the two presenters described why fanfiction is beneficial to young patrons in libraries, how many main stream authors began in fanfiction, and even books that highlight fanfiction as a part of the plot line. Their focus was to help the audience understand what fanfiction is and why it should not be scoffed at as a writing style. In fact, studies show that teaching writing through fanfiction helps the novice writer because they do not need to come up with their own characters and their own worlds, they can just add to the one that already exists.

If a library has a creative writing program within it, for children or teens, allowing them to begin by writing fanfiction may be more helpful than making them create everything on their own. Though some patrons may have all those ideas others may be intimidated by the fact that they need to create everything themselves, especially if they only have a character idea that could fit into another world. This presentation encouraged librarians to continue to embrace pop culture in their libraries through clubs and programming that highlight items like fanfiction, graphic novels, and cosplay. After the presentation, the presenters welcomed a discussion on how the librarians in the session felt about fanfiction in general and about it as a tool to be used to help with creative writing.

Get Your Library Ready for the Solar Eclipse

On Monday, August 21, 2017, the Moon will pass in front of the sun and cast its shadow will across North America, resulting in a solar eclipse.

Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Nebraska, Missouri, Tennessee, South Carolina, and parts of a few other states will be lucky enough to witness the total solar eclipse (a spectacle like this hasn’t been visible in the continental United States in just under 40 years). The rest of us will experience a partial solar eclipse (the moon will cover part of the sun).

Check out this cool video by NASA that predicts the trajectory of the total and partial solar eclipse:

 

Some are calling this the celestial event of the century. Don’t let your library miss out on this great opportunity!

Here are some great resources to get your library ready for the solar eclipse:

Adult Programming Resources

The following is a list of resources relating to adult programming and the 2017 Renewal & Development session “Adults Only: Adult Programming in Public Libraries.”

Resources for “Adults Only: Adult Programming in Public Libraries” (2017 R&D Session)

State Library Resources

Other Resources

Archiving in Rural Libraries: Photographs

Many of the most popular documents in a town’s past are its photographs. These photographs may have been given to the library because it is where all of the historical documents are stored or they may have been donated by a patron of the library. For whatever reason, rural libraries tend to have a large amount of photographs that document their town’s history. Archiving photographs can be as simple as putting them in acid & lignin free folders and boxes or Mylar sleeves and then storing them in a dark room. But for those who would like to display their collection of photographs they have a few options.

If creating a display with photographs from the archive do not display them in direct sunlight. The UV rays are what make documents and pictures fade over time. I would also suggest keeping them in a clear envelope of some type. Two common types are Mylar and Polyester envelopes. For the library that would like to allow their patrons to look through their photographs without having worry about them wearing gloves and damaging the photo, I would suggest scrapbooking them into albums. Though this may sound silly it is actually a very effective and efficient way to organize and display photographs. The majority of scrapbooks and their pages are acid & lignin free and the adhesives for them are also acid & lignin free. This is important because acid in tape is what turns the tape yellow in time and would therefore further damage the photographs. If the sound of sticking an old photograph to a page is slightly abhorrent I would suggest using photograph corners. With those the photo is never stuck in the scrapbook.

In a scrapbook you can also transcribe any writings that happen to be on the back of the photograph. This will make it easier for patrons to learn about the item and the transcription will prevent any future need to see the back of the photograph if it is placed directly on the page. Each page of the scrapbook should also have a Mylar sleeve. This will protect the photographs from being touched when a patron is looking at them as well as preventing dust and other damage. Scrapbooking can be a fun and innovative way to preserve a town’s photographs and display the history of the town at the same time.

Additionally, for those of you that feel like scrapbooking will be a lot of extra work but like the idea of allowing the patrons to just look through the photographs I would suggest putting them in an album. You can purchase photograph sleeves to the size of the pictures in your collection and then put them in a nice 3-ring binder. I would suggest not using a binder from Wal-Mart or Target because they are not archivally safe.

Some places to purchase archival scrapbooking supplies:

  1. Gaylord Archival Supplies:
    1. They might be one of the pricer options but you know for sure everything they sell is archival quality.
    2. Scrapbook: Selection of Scrapbooks
    3. Page adhesive squares: Photo Corners
  2. Hobby Lobby:
    1. As a general craft and hobby store this one will have scrapbooks and pages but it will also have albums that will come with photograph pages.
    2. Scrapbook Supply Page
    3. Page adhesives: Clear Photo Corners
  3. Micheals:
    1. Like Hobby Lobby, Micheals is a general craft and hobby story that will cater to scrapbook needs.
    2. Scrapbook Supply Page
    3. Page adhesive squares: Clear Photo Corners
  4. Hollinger Metal Edge:
    1. Like Gaylord, this is a pricer option but it comes with the assurance that everything you purchase will be archivally safe for your photographs
    2. Scrapbook Supply Page: Scrapbook Option
    3. Page adhesives: Photo Corners

Note: Page protectors vary depending on the scrapbook decided on. Many of the refill pages will come with page protectors so check that when ordering.