Category Archives: Reader’s Advisory

Book Lists – Sci Fi & Fantasy

Looking for a good science fiction/ fantasy book to read? Looking for a good science fiction/ fantasy book to recommend to your patrons? Looking for a good science fiction/ fantasy book to add to your collection? If so, here are some great lists for you!

Book Lists – 100 Must Reads

Looking for a good book to read? Looking for a good book to recommend to your patrons? Looking for a good book to add to your collection? If so, here are some great lists for you!

Readers Advisory Resources

Readers Advisory is a service libraries offer that includes helping readers locate materials through recommendations, book lists, displays, social networking, and other means. Basically, readers advisory means recommending books to patrons.

All libraries provide readers advisory services whether they realize it or not. It can be done “informally” (by verbally recommending books to patrons) and “formally” (by using displays and handouts).

If your library has recommended items to patrons either “formally” or “informally,” your library has done readers advisory. (Hint: remember this when filling out your library’s annual report)

If you would like to expand your library’s readers advisory services or if you would like to learn more about this service, here are some great resources:

Resources specifically for teens/ young adults:

Book Lists – Summer is Coming

Looking for a good book to read? Looking for a good book to recommend to your patrons? Looking for a good book to add to your collection? If so, here are some great lists for you!

It’s still technically spring, but summer is coming (Game of Thrones fans will appreciate this image); so here are some books to get you through spring and ready for summer:

Book Lists – YA

Looking for a good YA book to read? Looking for a good YA book to recommend to your patrons? Looking for a good YA book to add to your collection? If so, here are some great lists for you!

Book Lists

Looking for a good book to read? Looking for a good book to recommend to your patrons? Looking for a good book to add to your collection? If so, here are some great lists for you!

Best Books of 2016 & Best Forthcoming Books of 2017

Looking for a good book to read? Looking for a book to recommend to a patron? Looking for some books to add to your library’s collection? If so, here are some great lists for you!

2016 has come and gone. With the end of one year and the beginning of another, we can look back on the best books from 2016; and we can also look ahead with anticipation to some new books in 2017. Review the categories in the lists below to find the perfect book for you, your library, or your patrons.

2016

2017

NDLCC Standards Compliance: Reader’s Advisory

Guest post by Mary Soucie, State Librarian (first published in the June 2016 issue of Flickertale)

After this year’s public library annual report, Library Development Manager Eric Stroshane completed an analysis of how our public libraries are doing in regards to being in compliance with the North Dakota Library Coordinating Council (NDLCC) Standards for Public Libraries. There are categories that all libraries are in compliance with. We are going to highlight the areas that don’t have 100% compliance.

The first topic we are going to write about is Reader’s Advisory. Reader’s Advisory (RA) is the act of recommending both fiction and nonfiction titles to patrons through direct and indirect methods.

books1[1]Direct is pretty straight and word forward. A patron asks for a good book, a mystery book, a self-help book… insert any request here. A librarian or staff member directs the patron to one or more titles that will fit their needs. Indirect includes everything from book displays to booklists/pathfinders to bookmarks.

In 2014, Library Journal published an article entitled “The State of Reader’s Advisory.” They identified four points of service where RA takes place:

In-person RA takes place 85% of the time at the reference desk and 59% at the circulation desk. Self-directed RA is also highly popular, with 94% of libraries creating book displays, for example, and 75% offering book lists. Book-oriented programs are widespread, too: the survey shows that book clubs (89%) and author visits (86%) are held at most libraries. The fourth point of service was digital: 79% of libraries provide read-alikes or other such tips on their websites, and a little less than half, recommendations via social media.

You can read the rest of the article at: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2014/02/library-services/the-state-of-readers-advisory/#_

I’ve taken advantage of RA via social networking several times and I love it. I’m not sure if any of our ND libraries are offering this but if you are, please be sure to let me know. One way to provide RA via social networking is to ask a reader to provide the last title they’ve read and then librarians recommend 3-5 titles based on that title. Another is to share book reviews via Twitter or Facebook. I know we do have some librarians doing this.

I think more of our libraries are providing Reader’s Advisory Services than indicated by the annual report. Hopefully, this article has helped you better identify the ways that you are providing RA that you didn’t identify as such.

If you have questions about the standards, please contact any member of the Library Development Team.

“YALSA’s Teens’ Top Ten” Nominees for 2016

Teens' Top TenYALSA has posted the list of the 2016 Teens’ Top Ten Nominees. The 26 books on this list are the favorites from 2015, nominated and chosen by teens. Voting takes place between August 15 and Teen Read Week (October 9-15, 2016), with the 10 winners being announced the week after Teen Read Week.

Now is a great time to have your teens start reading the nominees so they are ready to vote when the time comes. This will also get teens reading during the summer, which is the ultimate goal. Continue reading

Make Diversity a Goal at Your Library

This is a guest post by Stacey Goldade, head of the Statewide Catalog Development Department at the North Dakota State Library.

For patrons to want to come to your library, you’re going to have to have something that appeals to them. That means a wide range of topics, formats, genres, stuff for all ages, etc., which means making sure you have enough materials about diverse kinds of people. I know you may say that practically all your population is white and of Scandinavian descent, but that’s changing and even if it was true, the whole point of a library is to learn about new things. So even though I’m a white woman, one of the most interesting books I’ve ever read was Black Like Me by John Howard Griffin, which let me see what being a black man in the south in the 1950s was like. It’s very unlikely you have anyone in your community that is an astronaut or a pro-football player, but you have books about space and sports right? Because people still want to learn about those topics even if that’s not their profession or their background. People want to learn about other people too, so make sure you are providing them with books about all kinds of people.

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