Tag Archives: Standards

YA Programming: Resources & NDLCC Standards

NDLCC Standards

Programming is a vital service that public libraries provide. Because of this, the North Dakota Library Coordinating Council (NDLCC) Standards for Public Libraries includes programming requirements. Consult the Standards for additional information.

Definition

So what exactly is a young adult program? Well, the federal definition (slightly reworded) is as follows:

Any planned event for which the primary audience is young adults (age 12-18) and which introduces the attendees to any of the broad range of library services or activities for young adults or which directly provides information to participants.

Young adult programs may cover use of the library, library services, or library tours. They programs may also provide cultural, recreational, or educational information, often designed to meet a specific social need.

Examples of young adult programs include board game nights, Nerf battles, video game tournaments, escape rooms, coding clubs, trivia, selfie contests, etc.

Young adult programs can be held on-site or off-site and be sponsored or co-sponsored by the library. Young adult programs sponsored by other groups that use library facilities are not considered a program of the library.

If young adult programs are offered as a series, each program in the series can be counted. For example, a coding club offered twice a month should be counted as 24 programs.

Resources

There are a lot of resources available online relating to library programming. It can be a little overwhelming to even know where to start. Below is a list of resources that make great starting points.

Young Adult Programming Resources:

General Resources (for all ages):

Book Drops: Options & the NDLCC Standards

NDLCC Standards

The North Dakota Library Coordinating Council (NDLCC) Standards for Public Libraries includes requirements for libraries having a secure, after-hours book return.

A book return may be a drop box, basket, return shelf, or some other receptacle located either outside of the building or in another location that allows patrons to return library materials outside of the library’s open hours.

Book Drop Alternative

Book-returns can be expensive to purchase or replace. A Demco product, for example, can run $800–$4,000. We recognize that this price range isn’t possible for some libraries, so we have found a solution. Consider using an architectural mailbox like this one:

Book Return

The Elephantrunk Parcel Drop Box ranges in price from $220–$320 and comes in four different colors. It can easily be bolted into the cement outside of your library and treated like a regular book drop (at a fraction of the cost). This drop box satisfies the standard to have an after-hours book return at your library and allows your patrons to safely return their materials at their convenience.

Continuing Education & NDLCC Standards

Continuing education (CE) is defined as an in-person or online training or workshop that furthers knowledge related to libraries, management, or job-related duties.

The North Dakota Library Coordinating Council (NDLCC) Standards for Public Libraries includes requirements for attending continuing education opportunities each year. Examples include library-related workshops, webinars, and conferences. [Note: If are unable to attend a live webinar, watching the recording would also suffice.]

The North Dakota State Library (NDSL) offers many training opportunities throughout the year. Keep an eye on NDSL’s monthly publication Flickertale for more information on upcoming CE opportunities.

Trainings from other library-related organizations would also count toward this standard.

Explore the list below to broaden your continuing education horizons.

Webinars

Most webinars are free and typically last 30-60 minutes.

  • Webinars (North Dakota State Library) – webinars hosted and/or presented by NDSL
  • WSL Training Calendar (Wyoming State Library) – the definitive place to find library-related webinars from across the county

Conferences

Workshops

  • Summer Summit (North Dakota State Library) – an annual library management symposium that invites library directors, board members, and staff are encouraged to attend
  • Research Methods (North Dakota State Library) – the course explores different types of research methods, library subscription databases, and internet search engines
  • Summer Reading Workshops (North Dakota State Library) – workshops hosted by NDSL staff on the upcoming Summer Reading Program

Video Digitization & Preservation Resources

Best practices and standards for video digitization widely differ. However, there are exceptional resources available online that can assist you with your video digitization needs. Consult the resources listed below for additional information. Contact the Digital Initiatives team at the North Dakota State Library if you have any questions.

Children Programming: Resources & NDLCC Standards

NDLCC Standards

Programming is a vital service that public libraries provide. Because of this, the North Dakota Library Coordinating Council (NDLCC) Standards for Public Libraries includes requirements for children’s programming. Consult the Standards for additional information.

Definition

So what exactly is a children’s program? Well, the federal definition (slightly reworded) is as follows:

Any planned event for which the primary audience is children (age 0-11) and which introduces the attendees to any of the broad range of library services or activities for young adults or which directly provides information to participants.

Children’s programs may cover use of the library, library services, or library tours. They may also provide cultural, recreational, or educational information, often designed to meet a specific social need.

Examples of children’s programs include story hours, summer reading events, arts and crafts, scavenger hunts, Lego clubs, reading to animals, movie nights, STEM activities, etc.

Children’s programs can be held on-site or off-site and be sponsored or co-sponsored by the library. Children’s programs sponsored by other groups that use library facilities are not considered a program of the library.

If children’s programs are offered as a series, each program in the series can be counted. For example, a story hour offered once a week, for of total of 48 weeks a year, should be counted as 48 programs.

Resources

There are a lot of resources available online relating to library programming. It can be a little overwhelming to even know where to start. Below is a list of resources that make great starting points.

Children’s Programming Resources:

General Resources (for all ages):

Adult Programming: Resources & NDLCC Standards

NDLCC Standards

Programming is a vital service that public libraries provide. Because of this, the North Dakota Library Coordinating Council (NDLCC) Standards for Public Libraries includes programming requirements. Consult the Standards for additional information.

Definition

So what exactly is an adult program? Well, the federal definition (slightly reworded) is as follows:

Any planned event for which the primary audience is adults (age 19+) and which introduces the attendees to any of the broad range of library services or activities for adults or which directly provides information to participants.

Adult programs may cover use of the library, library services, or library tours. They may also provide cultural, recreational, or educational information, often designed to meet a specific social need.

Examples of adult programs include book clubs, escape rooms, knitting and crocheting clubs, genealogy 101 classes, resume building workshops, adult coloring, lectures, etc.

Adult programs can be held on-site or off-site and be sponsored or co-sponsored by the library. Adult programs sponsored by other groups that use library facilities are not considered a program of the library.

If adult programs are offered as a series, count each program in the series. For example, a book club offered once a week, for a total of 52 weeks a year, should be counted as 52 programs (a very prolific book club in this hypothetical scenario).

Resources

There are a lot of resources available online relating to library programming. It can be a little overwhelming to even know where to start. Below is a list of resources that make great starting points.

Adult Programming Resources:

General Resources (for all ages):

NDLCC Standards Compliance Resource Links

Whether or not you attended one of our recent Summer Summit meetings, I wanted to ensure these resources were readily available and in one convenient location. If you need further assistance, don’t hesitate to contact your friendly Library Development Specialist here at the North Dakota State Library!